The social media concierge who turns weddings into content

Name: Kristine Sattore
The profession: Wedding content creator
The organisation: The Modern Bride’s BFF
The job title: Social media concierge
The pay: $100,000

Social media concierge Kristine Sattore wears black to blend in and brings snacks for hungry brides on their wedding day.
Social media concierge Kristine Sattore wears black to blend in and brings snacks for hungry brides on their wedding day.Credit: @beseensocials

8am: When I first saw a trend on TikTok for wedding content creators, I thought it was so strange. Then I realised how useful it could be. It’s a different job to a wedding photographer, who takes photos you might have blown up for your wall.

Wedding content creators take photos for digital sharing or to keep on your phone. It’s a good way to have your wedding photos available quickly to share with people who couldn’t attend or to put on your social networks.

I’d been professionally doing content creation for about three years when I started this business. I thought it would be a side gig, but I started the business on a Saturday and then, coincidentally, got made redundant on the following Monday. Now, it’s my full-time business.

We did over 60 weddings in our first year, and this year, I’ll be doing wedding content creation jobs in Tasmania, Europe and possibly even New York.

It’s often a 12-hour day, so I need to be prepared. I ensure all my equipment is packed the night before. I need both my iPhone and an extra one, a gimbal stabiliser and a battery pack (or two!). Sometimes the bride requests a digital Polaroid camera for guests, so I’ll take that too.

I also need to make sure my clothing, hair and makeup are all appropriate for a wedding. I chose black for my team, as it doesn’t stand out. Plus, venue staff often wear black, so we blend in.

10am: My morning is spent capturing moments with the bride, bridesmaids and the bride’s parents. We’ve usually met online but not in person. It’s always crazy in the morning; there’s so much going on. The bride is either very nonchalant or very particular – it can go either way.

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We really try to be their friend on the day and do things like getting water, helping out with holding flowers during photographer shots, or holding the gown when it’s raining. I also make sure I introduce myself to the photographer and videographer, and it’s crucial to assure them we will not be in their way.

1.30pm: At the ceremony we want to take a few hero shots, like the bride walking in, the groom’s reaction, and the newlyweds walking down the aisle. For the rest, we don’t want to take away from the moment, so we try to be unobtrusive, especially if it’s a religious ceremony.

The role definitely won’t replace photographers, although there’s some debate if it will replace videographers.

A lot of our brides don’t want the whole ceremony documented – some tell me that’s the “boring part”!

3.30pm: We go to the photo location with the bridal party to capture content so people feel as if they were there. I look for interactions between the bride and groom when they are very much themselves, even in their wedding outfits.

They might be mucking around or just having a lovely romantic moment, perhaps dancing. When this happens, I like to capture the bridal party watching on, you can see the love they have for them.

I pack snacks for me and often bring extra for the bride. Some brides don’t eat all day, and when they get to the photo location, they slow down a little bit and realise how hungry they are.

8.30pm: The reception might go till quite late, and there’s a lot to document. There’s the bridal entrance, the guests’ reaction when walking into the venue, the first dance and the cake cutting. Some brides also specifically require the speeches to be filmed uncut and in full. Then, I want to capture guests dancing or any fun TikTok trends that the couple has decided to do.

The role definitely won’t replace photographers, although there’s some debate if it will replace videographers. I don’t think it will. That takes a lot of time and effort in comparison to making a 30-second highlight reel.

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